by Zero2Cool on 3/26/2015 9:25:53 AM
The NFL owners are paying Roger Goodell over $40 million.

We have heard the Calvin Johnson rule, and then the Dez Bryant catch not a catch and the NFL has agreed to modify some of the language. There is an easy solution to determining a catch and to make it black and white. The NFL does not want this and this is further evidenced by the lack of following through with Bill Belichick proposal of adding four cameras in the end zone as to provide more angles for reviews.

I have a lot of respect for Belichick and think he's one of the top head coaches of all time. He irks the media often and that is something I admire quite a bit. And I fully agree with him that more cameras would make more for more accurate decisions on reviews.

The NFL sees value in paying Scapegoat Goodell $40 million to take the heat for their decisions or lack thereof. When it comes to spending cash on improving the accuracy of the game, that's a no no because it means less arguing would means less headlines.

We're in March and still talking about blown calls, that's essentially free publicity for their product. Why spend dollars that could minimize some of those headlines and that attention?
by porky88 on 3/2/2015 2:23:59 AM
Major changes have already come to Green Bay in 2015. Coach Mike McCarthy will no longer call plays, believing he can better manage the game without the added responsibility of play calling. Tom Clements will assume those duties following his promotion to associate head coach. Receivers coach Edgar Bennett is now the team’s offensive coordinator.

The changes, coming in the wake of the collapse in Seattle, were surprising. McCarthy has always prided himself on being the team’s play-caller, so for him to give up those duties suggests a bit of soul searching was done since the season ended.

These changes will mean very little, though, if the Packers fail to execute a sensible offseason plan, so I've narrowed this offseason down to three simple steps. Here's a look at what it consists of.

1. Re-sign Randall Cobb

A recent report suggested Cobb, 24, is looking for a deal that’ll pay him an annual salary of $9 million. He’d be worth every penny. Next to Aaron Rodgers, there is no other player more valuable to the offense. Yes, that includes Jordy Nelson. If you combine Cobb’s regular-season stats with his playoff stats, then his and Nelson’s numbers are nearly identical. In 18 games, Cobb caught 106 passes for 1,465 yards and 13 touchdowns while Nelson caught 105 passes for 1,612 yards and 13 touchdowns. More important, Cobb came through in the clutch. It’s not a coincidence that a Rodgers completion to Cobb cemented Green Bay’s two biggest victories of the season.

Facing the Patriots in week 11, Rodgers found Cobb for a seven-yard gain to convert a third-and-5 with two minutes remaining. The Patriots, without any timeouts, were unable to stop the clock. The same situation played out against Dallas in the playoffs, except Rodgers connected with Cobb for a gain of 12 yards on third-and-11. Like the Patriots before them, the Cowboys had no more timeouts. These conversations weren’t simple pitch and catches, either. Cobb made both catches in traffic, exhibiting terrific concentration in the process. Perhaps the most notable play of his career came in 2013. With the NFC North title on the line in Chicago, Rodgers and Cobb connected on a 66-yard touchdown with 1:43 remaining.

Many mistakenly believe the Packers are prepared to move on from him because they selected Davante Adams and Jeff Janis in the 2014 draft. Neither Adams nor Janis has a skill set that compares with his, though. In fact, they’re much more comparable to James Jones who worked better as a split end or flanker. Cobb works the slot, possibly better than any receiver in the NFL does. He’s also capable of lining up in the backfield, something McCarthy frequently did with him when he wanted to spark his offense. Letting go a young, homegrown receiver held in high regard by coaches and the front office would be uncharacteristic of Ted Thompson.

2. Re-sign Bryan Bulaga

One of the valid criticisms of Thompson’s tenure as general manager has been his inability to field a solid offensive line. That critique fell on its face last season. For the first time since 2003-04, the Packers produced an offensive line without a glairing weakness. The guard tandem of Josh Sitton and T.J. Lang is perhaps the best in the league, while rookie center Corey Linsley played like an all-pro. David Bakhtiari is an improving left tackle, and Bulaga re-established himself as one of the better right tackles in the game. The rapport this offensive line has established might be short-lived, though. Bulaga is an unrestricted free agent.

He is a balanced tackle, equally effective as a pass and run blocker. A team my feel incline to give him a shot at left tackle given the woeful market for the position. Such a move would surely drive up his cost, which should already be hefty enough. After years of fans fretting over the offensive line, it’d be heartbreaking to see a promising unit broken up after just one season together. It may happen. The Packers are a frugal organization. It’s unlikely they’ll give left tackle money to a right tackle.

3. Upgrade the Middle of the Defense

The middle of Green Bay’s defense was a liability in 2014. They finished No. 20 against the run, despite playing substantially better after using Clay Matthews inside in the season's second half. Nevertheless, Dallas running back DeMarco Murray and Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch still gashed Green Bay in the postseason.

A new nose tackle and at least one -- possibly two -- new inside linebackers would improve the defense dramatically. The draft offers many suitable options. With the No. 30 overall pick, the Packers are in prime position to land an inside linebacker capable of making an immediate impact.

Nose tackle is a bit more complicated. Thompson could use his first-round pick on Oklahoma’s Jordan Phillips, but a defensive lineman’s transition to the NFL is difficult. It usually takes a few years before they begin making an impact. Therefore, if the Packers select a defensive lineman with its top pick, they are probably thinking about 2016 and beyond rather than 2015. Perhaps they’ll try their hand at free agency for the second consecutive offseason.

Click the following link for more offseason analysis on the Packers and the rest of the NFC North: http://www.row12.com/art...orth_Offseason_Forecast/
by Zero2Cool on 2/27/2015 1:11:33 PM
Part I of the responsive design layout was implemented during the last off season which included the core site structure.

Part II of this project is the YAF Forums that we use for discussions. This is a complete overhaul of the YAF controls design and is very time consuming. I've been looking at other forum software for concepts of what they did that works and what doesn't work and what I like and don't like to help build a solid user experience on multiple devices.

The Forum Category List (seen here) is the closest to being done.


NOTE: You have to bust your cache to get the updated CSS changes. To do this, you must manually reload the webpage that looks "goofy" by hitting F5 or Right Click > Refresh (or reload depending on browser).


Agenda
  1. Forum Category List - 90% completed
  2. Topics List - 5% completed
  3. Posts List - 0%


Updated 27 Feb 2015


by Zero2Cool on 2/6/2015 1:09:08 PM
From the looks of it the Packers have over $20 million in cap space for these Free Agents.

Quite confident Randall Cobb and Bryan Bulaga will somehow, someway fit under the 2015 cap. Have no worries!


Source It Up said:
UNDERSTANDING THE FOLLOWING TABLE

Free Agents
The total number of free agents a team currently carries, including the amount of Unrestricted Free Agents in parenthesis. (Click this to load the complete list).

2014 Rollover
These figures represent the estimated unused cap dollars each team is currently able to rollover from their 2014 roster. The Rams are currently the only team without available rollover money.

Total Cap $
This figure represents the total of ALL active players signed to a team's 2015 roster (including players already suspended, and dead cap).

Signed Players
The number of players currently with a 2015 contract.

Top 51 Cap $
The combined cap total for the 51 largest contracts on a team's roster. Teams will be expected to get this figure under the finalized cap figure by March 10, 2015 (4PM EST). For now we're estimating that figure to be $142 million.

Estimated Draft Pool
The maximum amount of estimated cap dollars a team will need to spend to sign all of their upcoming 2015 draft picks (assuming the rookie scale mimics the 2014 scale, though it may increase slightly if the overall team cap rises more than expected).

Projected Top 51 Cap Space
The estimated amount of space a team currently has to work with when subtracting the projected $142,000,000 + the est. 2014 rollover + the est. maximum draft pool from their Top 51 Cap $.



Green Bay Packers
After nearly finding themselves in the Super Bowl, the Packers are in excellent shape heading into the offseason, carrying more than $21M in space. Notable free agents include RT Bryan Bulaga, and WR Randall Cobb.


Click To See Table
by Zero2Cool on 2/6/2015 8:27:38 AM
Listening to the Aaron Rodgers Show with Jason Wilde yesterday something came up that I thought was interesting and reminded me of something early in his career. When Mike McCarthy first took over he implemented some rules about weight and body fat.

Around January 2007, Rodgers said "Mike always hounds me about my weight, my body fat. All the quarterbacks he's ever been around have always been around 8% body fat, and I'm about 10. So I want to get down to about 8%. At least. Remember (quarterback) Tom Arth? He was 5.6%, which is incredible. Al (Harris) is, like, 3, I think."

During his radio show, Rodgers attributed his hamstring injury versus Saints to poor hydration due to his trying to make game-day weight followed up with him saying that the weigh-ins are “an interesting concept in itself, and I’m not going to debate that at this moment.”. It seems obvious that Rodgers is still not thrilled about the weight requirements.

He knows what the game-day weight is and has a full week to to make it. How hard can that possibly be for a person who's job is their body?
by Zero2Cool on 2/2/2015 7:34:31 AM
I can see Bryan Bulaga being franchised in two weeks.

  • Feb. 16: Teams can start designating Franchise and Transition players

  • Feb. 17-23: NFL Scouting Combine

  • March 1: College Pro Days begin

  • March 7-10: Teams can enter into contract negotiations with unrestricted free agents

  • March 10 (before 4 p.m.): Teams must be under 2015 salary cap, exercise options with restricted free agents

  • March 10 (4 p.m.): 2015 league year and free agency officially begin

  • March 22-25: Annual league meetings

  • April 20: Clubs with returning head coaches can begin offseason workout programs

  • April 30-May 2: 2015 NFL Draft

  • May 8-11: Post-draft rookie minicamps
by porky88 on 1/23/2015 7:57:29 PM
Anyone been following the Senior Bowl?

I wanted to compile a list of players worth checking out if you’re following the game tomorrow or just interested in the draft.

If the Packers let Cobb go in free agency (a dumb move, in my opinion), they could look at Kansas State's Tyler Lockett and Duke’s Jamison Crowder as a replacement. Both are ideal slot receivers, while Davante Adams is more of a split end or flanker. I also like Ty Montgomery, but he’s had an up and down week. I have to do a little more homework on his 2014 season. Most of my notes on him are from 2013, where I thought he was a first-round caliber talent.

Grady Jarrett doesn’t have exceptional size, but the Packers seem to like undersized defensive tackles that can rush up field. He certainly does that. He’s quick-footed, and explodes off the ball. He'd be an option in their sub packages.

In the perfect world, Ted Thompson would trade up to select Washington’s Danny Shelton. He’s just a beast. A legit top 10 talent. Think Dontari Poe or even Haloti Ngata. I have more on him in the links below.

If Bryan Bulaga leaves, that puts the Packers in the market for a right tackle. I’m not sure T.J. Cummings is on the board when they pick, but La’el Collins would be. He’d bring a lot of power to the offensive line.

Clive Walford could be really good in Mike McCarthy’s offense. Why not double up on a pair of tight ends? More on him in the links below.

The guy I think would interest us the most is Stephone Anthony. He can play inside in a 34 or 43. He moves really well. We’re talking about a sideline to sideline inside linebacker. I think he’s the perfect compliment to Sam Barrington if the Packers intend to stay with him inside. Anthony also holds up real well in coverage. He’s a three-down, fast, big-hitting linebacker. It'd be great to get him in the second round.

The Packers like to draft Iowa guys. Maybe watch out for Carl Davis. He’s a bigger version of Jarrett. He gets up field and uses his hands to disengage from blockers well. He’s reportedly had a good week.

I think that’s a pretty good rundown of what caught my eye from a Packers perspective.

Here is a link to my Senior Bowl Stock Up Article: http://www.row12.com/article/2819/2015_Senior_Bowl_Stock_Up/

Here is one to my Senior Bowl Stock Down Article: http://www.row12.com/article/2820/2015_Senior_Bowl_Stock_Down/

I’m thinking front seven help for the draft. I’d like to see a nose guard and inside linebackers. Maybe even a cornerback.

Let me know which positions you're looking to see addressed.
by porky88 on 1/18/2015 7:52:46 PM
The quest for a repeat is alive and well.

The Seattle Seahawks overcame a 16-points halftime deficit to stun the Green Bay Packers in front of a rowdy crowd at CenturyLink Field. The victory sends Seattle to the Super Bowl for the second consecutive season, making them the first NFC team to go to back-to-back Super Bowls since the Packers did it in 1996-97.

An abnormal journey gave us the expected outcome. Turnovers allowed Green Bay to jump out to an early lead. The Packers intercepted quarterback Russell Wilson three times in the first half, but their inability to finish in the red zone kept Seattle in the hunt. Green Bay made three trips to the red zone, scoring just one touchdown and settling for two field goals. Early in the first quarter, the Packers faced a fourth and goal from the one-yard line. Green Bay coach Mike McCarthy opted to kick the field goal instead of going for the touchdown. McCarthy’s decision to kick will receive its share of scrutiny this week, but the Packers didn’t blow a 16-point lead because they didn’t go for a touchdown six minutes into the game. They lost because Seattle made the key second-half plays.

In my preview of this game, I picked Seattle because I thought they’d make the big play in crunch time. The Seahawks needed more than just a big play or two, though. Nearly everything had to go their way in the second half, and that’s exactly what happened.

They converted a key third-and-19 midway through the third quarter when Wilson found a wide-open Doug Baldwin. Four plays later, they scored a 19-yard touchdown on a fake field goal when holder Jon Ryan hit Clint Gresham for the score. After cutting Green Bay’s lead to 19-14 in the fourth quarter, they recovered an onside kick after Green Bay tight end Brandon Bostick failed to secure the ball. This led to Seattle taking their first lead of the game with less than two minutes remaining. Green Bay managed to force overtime, but the Packers never saw the ball in the extended period, as Wilson hit Jermaine Kearse for a 35-yard touchdown to send the Seahawks to the Super Bowl.

In many ways, the Packers blew it more than Seattle won it. Green Bay mishandled two crucial plays late in the game. Wilson threw his fourth interception of the game with about five minutes remaining. Safety Morgan Burnett, who caught the ball off a deflection, went to the ground immediately after making the play. You don't go to the ground with five minutes left, and Burnett just learned this lesson the hardest of ways. He had a lot of open field to gain yards. A decent return would've put the Packers in field goal range.

Burnett’s running mate in the secondary, rookie Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, had a pair of interceptions on the afternoon, but his judgment on Seattle’s two-point conversion was bizarre. The Packers heavily pressured Wilson on the attempt. He scrambled to his right before throwing the ball across the field. The ball lingered in the air long enough for Clinton-Dix to make a play on it, but he never did. Instead, it landed safety in the arms of tight end Luke Wilson, and Seattle’s improbable lead extended to three.

With less than two minutes remaining, Green Bay quarterback Aaron Rodgers drove the Packers down the field, putting them in position to tie the game. Kicker Mason Crosby connected on a 48-yard field goal, sending the game to overtime. Had Clinton-Dix made a better play on the ball just minutes earlier, Crosby’s kick may have sent the Packers to the Super Bowl.

Wilson is now 10-0 against Super Bowl winning quarterbacks, owning wins over Rodgers, Tom Brady, Drew Brees, and Eli and Peyton Manning. However, Wilson was not the hero of this game. Sure, he made two crucial overtime throws, but Green Bay clearly rattled him early. Seattle offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell recognized this, and turned to running back Marshawn Lynch.

In a performance that’ll surely come up when the Hall of Fame debates Lynch’s candidacy for enshrinement, the Seattle running back steamrolled his way through the heart of Green Bay’s defense. He finished the game with 25 carries for 157 yards and a touchdown.

Seattle’s defensive effort also deserves commendation. Green Bay’s early start had more to do with their field position advantage than their execution against the Seahawks defense. The Packers gained just 306 total yards, with Rodgers throwing for 178 on just 19 completions. Running back Eddie Lacy, who had 100 or more yards in 10 consecutive games, gained just 73 on 21 carries.

The Packers return to Green Bay devastated. They were less than five minutes away from reaching their sixth Super Bowl. Losing in Seattle goes down as one of the most excruciating defeats in the franchise’s history, arguably more so than Super Bowl XXXII and the 2007 NFC Championship.

History awaits Seattle two weeks from now. With a victory, they’ll be just the eighth team in the history of the NFL to win back-to-back Super Bowls, and the first to do so since the 2003-04 New England Patriots.

They’ll also have a legitimate claim as the team of the decade.

Visit Row12.com for more playoff coverage.

Click here for a recap of New England's thumping of Indianapolis.
by porky88 on 1/15/2015 5:17:27 PM
For the second consecutive season, the NFC Championship runs through Seattle. The Seahawks, who are looking to become the first team since the 2003-04 New England Patriots to repeat as Super Bowl champions, will host the Green Bay Packers.

Week 1 Rematch

The NFL season opened with Green Bay and Seattle on September 4. The Seahawks, playing in their first game since Super Bowl XLIX, throttled the Packers 36-16 in front of a sold-out crowd at CenturyLink Field.

Despite receiving a lot of coverage on television and radio this week, that game will have little impact on the outcome of this weekend’s rematch. If a couple of weeks are a lifetime in an NFL season, then what does that make four months? I suspect the Seahawks watched more film on the Packers from last week than they did from the season opener. Simply put, the Packers are a much better today than they were in September.

Green Bay entered week one with an inexperienced center. JC Tretter suffered a knee injury in the third preseason game, forcing rookie center Corey Linsley into action. The opener was baptism by fire for Linsley, who has now become one of the best interior offensive linemen in the NFC, and played more snaps (1,072) than any other Packer this season. The Ohio State product is a solid pass protector, and even better run blocker. He finishes blocks, and embodies the nastiness that has defined a Green Bay offensive line that also features all-pro guard Josh Sitton. At this point in his career, Linsley is a seasoned veteran.

The same applies to rookie receiver Davante Adams, who had his coming out party against the New England Patriots the first Sunday after Thanksgiving. Adams caught six passes for 121 yards against the Patriots. He was even better against Dallas last week, catching seven passes for 117 yards and a touchdown. Now the unquestioned No. 3 receiver in Green Bay’s passing attack, Adams played just nine snaps against Seattle.

The running game has been perhaps the biggest improvement in Green Bay’s arsenal since the last time these teams played. Eddie Lacy has totaled at least 100 yards in 10 consecutive games. As he did in 2013, Lacy has gotten better as the season progressed. He also runs well out of the shotgun, which the Packers used on every single play against the Cowboys last weekend. Without defensive tackle Brandon Mebane or his replacement Jordan Hill, the Seahawks could be susceptible to the run.

Extending Plays

By now, you know of the slight tear in Green Bay quarterback Aaron Rodgers’ left calf. The injury clearly limited him against the Cowboys, as I counted just twice he got outside the pocket. While he still carved Dallas up for 316 yards and three touchdowns, he’ll face an uphill climb against Seattle’s No. 1 pass defense.

Unlike Dallas, Seattle has multiple talented pass rushers. The trio of Michael Bennett, Cliff Avril, and Bruce Irvin combined for 18.5 sacks this season. They will attack Rodgers from all angles, making him even less comfortable than he already is. The Packers went out of their way to avoid cornerback Richard Sherman in the first meeting. Expect them to test him a few times this Sunday, but don’t expect them to deviate too far from their game plan. Rodgers is going to identify the favorable matchup at the line of scrimmage, and that’s going to be where he wants to go with the football. If he doesn’t get enough time in the pocket, he’ll need to extend plays to exploit any favorable matchup. Based on last weekend’s game, he doesn’t appear to have the strength in his calf to extend plays. Even if he gets sufficient protection, his receiving corps is going up against Seattle’s “Legion of Boom”, which hasn’t allowed a 100-yard receiver in eight games.

Extending plays won’t be an issue for Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson. Other than a healthy Rodgers, there is no one better outside the pocket than Wilson is. He senses pressure, and uses his athleticism to maneuver out of harms way. He also keeps his eyes downfield, looking for the open receiver. This is what makes him special, separating him from other scrambling quarterbacks.

And the Winner Is…

Look for the Packers to setoff a different vibe this weekend than they did in week one. September was a bigger game for the Seahawks than it was the Packers. They were playing at home for the first time since winning the franchise’s first Super Bowl. For them, week one was an extension of the previous seasons playoffs. It was just one of 16 for the Packers.

Motivation alone isn’t going to lead Green Bay to victory, though. They’ll need a valiant effort from their defense. Dallas rushed for 145 yards against them last week, but that’s not as bad as it looks on paper. Defensive coordinator Dom Capers calculated that he’d rather lose to DeMarco Murray than Dez Bryant, so he opted to have an extra defender -- usually safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix -- shadow Bryant for much of the game. The Packers won’t have to contend with Seattle’s receivers as they did Bryant. They have the talent in their defensive secondary to matchup with Doug Baldwin and Jermaine Kearse. As a result, they can use an extra defender in the box to help defend the run. This could make things interesting early, especially if the Packers can get an early score. The more this game becomes about Wilson and Rodgers, the better for the Packers. However, the Seahawks are a methodical team. Running back Marshawn Lynch consistently improves as the game progresses. Offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell is a discipline play caller, so in the event of an early Packers lead, it’s unlikely he’ll depart from the game plan.

The Packers will make this game interesting, and despite what the mainstream media is preaching, the Seahawks are beatable in CenturyLink Field. They just won’t lose this Sunday, though. Seattle is notorious for finishing strong and whether it’s their defense, Lynch, or Wilson, somebody will make the critical fourth quarter play needed to send the Seahawks back to the Super Bowl.

Seahawks 26 Packers 16

Please visit Row12.com for more great articles, including a preview of the AFC Championship.
by Zero2Cool on 1/13/2015 8:29:10 AM
The Packers will face their week one opponent, Seattle Seahawks, in the NFC Championship this coming Sunday.

During the week one meeting Percy Harvin led the Seahawks with 7 catches for 59 yards and he also had 4 jet sweeps for 41 yards. He is no longer with the Seahawks.

Also during that first meeting the Packers were 10 points down when Derek Sherrod became a turnstile and was directly the cause of a safety and ultimately that is when the Seahawks pulled away. He is no longer with the Packers.

Last thing of note about the first match up is James Starks had 7 carries for 37 yards for 5.7 average while Eddie Lacy had 12 carries for 34 yards for 2.8 yards a carry. Something to consider when they rotate Starks in for Lacy.


Seahawks scored 30 or more points three times (Packers, Raiders and Giants) in the regular season.
Packers scored 30 or more points eight times (Jets, Bears, Vikings, Panthers, Bears, Eagles, Falcons and Lions) in the regular season.



KEY MATCHUPS
Aaron Rodgers vs Seattle Defense
More is being made about this calf than needs to be. Rodgers says it only effects his running mobility, not his rhythm of throwing or planting to throw.
Slight Edge: Seattle

Shawn Slocum vs Kam Chancelor
Kam showed his leaping abilities last week against the Panthers and the Packers absolutely must find a way to take advantage of this. Unfortunately Slocum is a mental midget and the atroticous kicking woes will continue. I just hope Mason Crosby doesn't get killed in the process. What the Packers should do is a hard count or if they see Kam in the air, Tim Masthay (preferably Matt Flynn would hold) would turn and throw it to a streaking TE because that back end will be wide open.
Big Edge: Seattle

Packers Defense vs Russell Wilson
The aforementioned Harvin is longer with the Seahawks and they really do not have anyone other than Ricardo Lockette with threatening speed. The Packers have Sam Shields who is faster than Lockette and if I'm Dom Capers, I lock Shields on to him and bounce Casey Hayward and Tramon Williams on Doug Baldwin.
Edge: Seattle

Packers Tackling vs Marshawn Lynch
Marshawn Lynch is the back breaker and although the Packers have improved their tackling the last month, they haven't faced someone as powerful and menacing as Lynch.
Edge: Seattle


This game will not be decided by Russell Wilson or even Aaron Rodgers. The play of Corey Linsley, Davante Adams, Ha'Sean Clinton-Dix and Richard Rodgers collectively will decide the outcome more than either QB. If they play sound error free football, the Packers will have a chance. If these four falter, the game will be won easily by the Seahawks.

It does not matter who you are, when you are a 2nd year coordinator and teams are lining up to interview you for a head coaching vacancy, that is a distraction. No one is pounding down the doors to hire Packers assistants and Dan Quinn has teams blowing up his phone and that will be a slight advantage to the Packers.

Richard Sherman is going to be on the right side and as you can see from the graphic, that is where Rodgers is most efficient. Sherman will win this battle again and unfortunately for the Packers, the season starts and ends against the same team for the third season in a row.
[attach]1492[/attach]





The grades below are cumulative of the regular season and post season games from ProFootballFocus.com

OFFENSE
Blocking Grades
Packers Pass: +52.8 (1st) Run: -8.8 (16th)
Seahawks Pass: +25.7 (17th) Run: -15.6 (18th)

Passing Grades
Packers: +57.5 (1st)
Seahawks: +4.0 (13th)

Rushing Grades
Packers: +8.2 (8th)
Seahawks: +30.3 (1st)


DEFENSE
Run Defense Grades
Packers: -12.2 (28th)
Seahawks: +24.7 (10th)

Pass Coverage Grades
Packers: -4.7 (14th)
Seahawks: +31.5 (4th)

Pass Rush Grades
Packers: +18.9(13th)
Seahawks: +40.3 (6th)


SPECIAL TEAMS
Packers -14.3 (23rd)
Seahawks +22.8 (10th)

Overall Grades
Packers Offense: +111.9 (2nd) Defense: -12.2 (20th)
Seahawks Offense: -22.3 (13th) Defense: +83.8 (4th)


Zero's Power Ranking
Packers 1st Place
Seahawks 4th Place
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