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Offline Zero2Cool  
#1 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 7:06:17 AM(UTC)
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Cary Williams was offered $15 million over three years and this is his reason for turning it down. This is the kind of stuff that pisses off fathers who provide for three daughters on a yearly salary that doesn't come close to breaking the six figure mark, let alone eight figures over three years.

Cary Williams wrote:
For me to say the money ain’t good, that wasn’t the case. It’s good money, but my job is to make the most money I possibly can for my family. I’m thinking about my daughter and any future children I want to have. I want some kind of security, and the deal we had wasn’t like that.


I'm all for athletes maximizing their financial worth (careers get cut short), but don't imply you'd struggle raising a family with $15 million over three years. You spot me $5 million right now, I could "retire" and provide all three of my girls great lives plus afford to place them in nearly any college of their choice.

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wpr on 8/20/2012(UTC)
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Offline Pack93z  
#2 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 8:05:01 AM(UTC)
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I agree for the most part... and the greed of the NFL has been stuck in my craw prior to the lockout.. where they have a world by the ass and still can't find a way to work it out without proceeding into the legal arena.

That is the definition of greed.

That said... I don't know the contract details that were presented to Williams.. but with his wording.. I would have to believe that the guaranteed money is the issue. Probably short in his eyes.

I don't take much issue with guys pushing for some guarantees in their deals.. but again.. I don't know the structure of his deal to speak more than that upon it.
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Offline Zero2Cool  
#3 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 8:31:05 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Pack93z Go to Quoted Post
I agree for the most part... and the greed of the NFL has been stuck in my craw prior to the lockout.. where they have a world by the ass and still can't find a way to work it out without proceeding into the legal arena.

That is the definition of greed.

That said... I don't know the contract details that were presented to Williams.. but with his wording.. I would have to believe that the guaranteed money is the issue. Probably short in his eyes.

I don't take much issue with guys pushing for some guarantees in their deals.. but again.. I don't know the structure of his deal to speak more than that upon it.


I'm all for guys pushing to get their maximum value, but don't tell me you can't provide adequately for your family with $15 million over three years. That just ticks me off. If he comes out and says "I know its a lot of money, but I feel I'm worth more and am willing to take the chance", so be it. And he even said as much, but he had to throw in that family comment. That's the only thing that upsets me. Don't use the family as a bargaining chip. People support their families on $10/hour (~$22k a year).

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wpr on 8/20/2012(UTC)
Offline zombieslayer  
#4 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 9:11:18 AM(UTC)
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No way I could raise my family with only $15 million in 3 years. We'd be homeless. There's no way I could send my son to college. Maybe a community college at best.

I'd also have no retirement.

Such a damn shame that a guy like that only makes $15 million in 3 years. Damn shame. Makes me wanna cry.
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thanks Post received 2 applause.
wpr on 8/20/2012(UTC), rabidgopher04 on 8/24/2012(UTC)
Offline hardrocker950  
#5 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 9:11:59 AM(UTC)
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I have mixed feelings when it comes to these situations. While I agree that NFL players should be well paid for obvious reasons, I would do just about any job for that paycheck. That is good sized contract - it is likely a disagreement with the guarenteed pay.

Some players need to get a grip on reality - most families don't break the 6 figure mark and can still live comfortably. With that kind of bank, I would never be complaining about money. I would love to see some of these guys live on $20k a year. I understand that injury can halt a career, but that is a risk you take walking onto the field.
"I enjoy being just one of 53 on the team." - Aaron Rodgers
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wpr on 8/20/2012(UTC)
Offline Zero2Cool  
#6 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 9:44:02 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: hardrocker950 Go to Quoted Post
I have mixed feelings when it comes to these situations. While I agree that NFL players should be well paid for obvious reasons, I would do just about any job for that paycheck. That is good sized contract - it is likely a disagreement with the guarenteed pay.

Some players need to get a grip on reality - most families don't break the 6 figure mark and can still live comfortably. With that kind of bank, I would never be complaining about money. I would love to see some of these guys live on $20k a year. I understand that injury can halt a career, but that is a risk you take walking onto the field.


The injury could halt their career, but I believe a good portion of NFL players have a college degree to fall back on too.

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Offline Porforis  
#7 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 9:44:43 AM(UTC)
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The problem is when people get so accustomed to a rich lifestyle, that they can't see living any other way as living at all. God forbid their children will ever need to work a job in their lives, might have to buy their own car (or at least not get a luxury car from Daddy), and not have everything they want.
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Offline Porforis  
#8 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 9:48:10 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Zero2Cool Go to Quoted Post
The injury could halt their career, but I believe a good portion of NFL players have a college degree to fall back on too.


To be fair though, having a college degree is only worth so much, especially when their only adulthood job on their resume is "Professional Football Player". Having a wife that's been trying to find a job outside of food service with a Bachelors in Psychology (4.0 from a prestigious college) for the last 2 years, I know that a degree is no guarantee of a job. I know I'd be extremely hesitant to hire someone that's used to making millions of dollars, it's hard enough to find people that aren't used to doing what they enjoy and making millions to do work without complaining.
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Offline Zero2Cool  
#9 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 9:50:16 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Porforis Go to Quoted Post
To be fair though, having a college degree is only worth so much, especially when their only adulthood job on their resume is "Professional Football Player". Having a wife that's been trying to find a job outside of food service with a Bachelors in Psychology (4.0 from a prestigious college) for the last 2 years, I know that a degree is no guarantee of a job. I know I'd be extremely hesitant to hire someone that's used to making millions of dollars, it's hard enough to find people that aren't used to doing what they enjoy and making millions to do work without complaining.


A college degree is a step above someone who doesn't have a degree, therefore they have an advantage. Also, being a former professional sports player is a positive, not a negative. Of course, the position of employment also factors a role too.

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Offline Pack93z  
#10 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 9:53:06 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Zero2Cool Go to Quoted Post
I'm all for guys pushing to get their maximum value, but don't tell me you can't provide adequately for your family with $15 million over three years. That just ticks me off. If he comes out and says "I know its a lot of money, but I feel I'm worth more and am willing to take the chance", so be it. And he even said as much, but he had to throw in that family comment. That's the only thing that upsets me. Don't use the family as a bargaining chip. People support their families on $10/hour (~$22k a year).


My point there is simply this.. if they are not offering much in terms of guaranteed money.. if might not be a contract that secures his family long term.

3 year 15 million without much in guarantees offers little protection in this dog eat dog sport. He goes out and tears a knee up.. he might never see that money.

We don't know his financial situation.. his he supporting more than just his immediate family? Is he supporting a Mother, a Father? Brothers or sisters? Is there medical conditions anywhere in his family?

Not saying it is or isn't.. but without a chunk of guaranteed money, all you have is the potential to earn 15 over 3 in the cited example.

While most of us can't touch that type of cash, namely me lol, part of your job as a provider is to secure the family as best as you can.

So if the Ravens are backloading the deal.. or not offering much in terms of guarantees.. I could see the rational in the statement for a guy in his position and talent. NFL players have options we in the "real" world just don't have.

All I am saying is I can see why it is labeled as greed... but we just don't know enough details to understand his position.
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Offline Pack93z  
#11 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 9:58:33 AM(UTC)
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Excerpt of his story... Kid has seen alot.. from installing DirectTV and Sunday Ticket to playing on it.

Basically.. I think the kid has seen how drastic life and change.. and that might play into it in part.

Could have he worded it better.. yep.. and probably should have. Maybe the contract offer was fair from the Ravens.. I just don't know and refuse to judge him upon his choice and a single quoted line upon his choice. That is my way of thinking on it.



Quote:


Cary Williams overcame abuse and anguish on way to NFL
Adopted by his cousin, offered a scholarship by a school he'd never heard of and plucked by the Ravens, Williams found his way


Williams' father, Cary Williams Sr., was determined to do whatever it would take to keep his two sons alive, to keep them from joining a gang, but the burden was enormous. Both father and son agree on this much, even to this day. Williams' mother was diagnosed with schizophrenia when her two sons were very young, and Williams estimates he and his younger brother Ronald lived with her for no more than 10 months throughout their lives. They would visit her every time she checked into a mental hospital, always hoping and praying that this time, someone would help her get better. Those prayers were never answered.

"Every time she'd have one of her spells, she'd go into the mental asylum," Williams said. "That was the majority of my life. We'd go to different mental asylums and see her when she wasn't in the best condition. I felt like I didn't have a mother to a degree, because we didn't have a mother-son relationship. I loved her, but we were never able to sit down and have a real conversation, a heart-to-heart. It hurts me every single day when I think about it."

Cary Williams Sr. will admit, right up front, that he struggled to keep his head above water as a single father. He was confused, overwhelmed, and occasionally angry. He was too proud, he says now, to ask for help. At some point, he told himself the most important thing he could do for his sons was keep them away from drugs, and keep them alive. He had been a high school track star growing up in Dade County in the 1970s, and Cary and his brother never tired of hearing the neighborhood urban legend about the day their father outran a car in a street race. Sports, Williams Sr. believed, provided the only chance he had.
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Offline Pack93z  
#12 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 10:10:25 AM(UTC)
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And lets look at more of the context of his statement.. and why he made the decision he did.

Basically.. he played hurt last season.. he feels healthy he can play better and improve his value. Also.. he is still a restricted Free Agent.. so the Ravens are trying to buy out one year for the under market value of the remaining to.. but probably still fair to all as he is getting more of that money up front this season.

IMO.. he is gambling on his health here.. and although he might be trying to do the best he can do, it is apparent that it isn't the security he is looking for.. other wise he would probably take the deal and bank the money this season.

Either way.. even his 1.927 million this year should provide a comfortable level of security most of us will never approach.. so yes Zero I understand your point.

Living in the real world that we walk in.. yes it is a bullshit statement to make. But that is a different world..

http://www.baltimoresun....20120819,0,6784654.story


Quote:
Williams emerged as a starter for the first time last season, recording a career-high 77 tackles and 18 pass deflections with two forced fumbles.

Although Williams underwent surgery during the offseason to repair a torn labrum in his right hip, the Ravens attempted to lock him up on a long-term basis.

Instead, though, Williams signed his one-year, $1.927 million restricted free agent tender.

"Cary was fired up about his value and what he's worth after a successful year," said Marc Lillibridge, Williams' agent. "We feel like if he can play as good or better than last season and lead the Ravens to a Super Bowl, then he'll get his just due. I completely agree with that. You roll the dice on yourself your entire life.

"Cary loves challenges and people that doubt him. He thrives on proving people wrong. Cary continues to amaze people with his determination. This is simply another challenge he will take on, and ultimately conquer."
The wolves will never lose sleep over the feelings of the sheep.

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Offline Porforis  
#13 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 10:23:04 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Zero2Cool Go to Quoted Post
A college degree is a step above someone who doesn't have a degree, therefore they have an advantage. Also, being a former professional sports player is a positive, not a negative. Of course, the position of employment also factors a role too.


I really don't see how being a former NFL player would be a positive for many businesses, outside of Sales or anything else that will make your customers immediately respond to that person. But even then, without the appropriate skills, that sort of attention is unlikely to turn into sales. There's exceptions of course, but I'd be hesitant to hire... Well, anybody used to making tons of money and being adored, in the spotlight. Yes, being in the NFL and successful enough to be in the "millions of dollars" discussion would mean that this person has at least decent teamwork skills and presumably work ethic. But what happens to that work ethic when you pay them 1/100,000th of what they're used to? What about the crappy customers, lack of major attention received for any good job done? I may be selling some people short, but again there's tons of people out there completely unwilling to put forth any effort unless they have a job they really like and are getting paid what they think they're worth. I don't see your standard NFL player as having a dramatic amount more basic work ethic than Joe Worker, and hiring a multimillionaire that's used to having their every good move highlighted (as well as bad, to be fair) would make me extremely nervous.
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Offline Since69  
#14 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 10:32:56 AM(UTC)
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I had to google his name; guess how I feel about his "need" to earn more than $5M a year...
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Zero2Cool on 8/20/2012(UTC)
Offline wpr  
#15 Posted : Monday, August 20, 2012 10:33:12 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Porforis Go to Quoted Post
I really don't see how being a former NFL player would be a positive for many businesses, outside of Sales or anything else that will make your customers immediately respond to that person. But even then, without the appropriate skills, that sort of attention is unlikely to turn into sales. There's exceptions of course, but I'd be hesitant to hire... Well, anybody used to making tons of money and being adored, in the spotlight. Yes, being in the NFL and successful enough to be in the "millions of dollars" discussion would mean that this person has at least decent teamwork skills and presumably work ethic. But what happens to that work ethic when you pay them 1/100,000th of what they're used to? What about the crappy customers, lack of major attention received for any good job done? I may be selling some people short, but again there's tons of people out there completely unwilling to put forth any effort unless they have a job they really like and are getting paid what they think they're worth. I don't see your standard NFL player as having a dramatic amount more basic work ethic than Joe Worker, and hiring a multimillionaire that's used to having their every good move highlighted (as well as bad, to be fair) would make me extremely nervous.


I am paraphrasing this but several of the players on the Packers teams from the 60's have said that when Vince taught them how to succeed and be winners on the field they took those lessons and were able to apply them in the business world off the field and become extremely successful. they often said they had more success after playing in the NFL than they did when they played. Part of the reason was the way things inflated in the 70s and 80s. Part of the reason is they were facing people who didn't have the will to push themselves like most players in the NFL that they faced.
"You don't hurt 'em if you don't hit 'em." Chesty Puller



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zombieslayer on 8/20/2012(UTC), DakotaT on 8/20/2012(UTC)
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